Enforceability of 20 mph speed limits

Posted to the Flockton Bypass facebook group (10 April 2019) by David Rawling:

An extract from Section 12 of the link. The last paragraph tells us what the community already know, but needs the authorities to act upon:

20 MPH Flockton - flocktonbypass.co.ukThe study has shown that the speed at which people drive is influenced more by the look and feel of the road, than whether a 20 mph or 30 mph limit is in place. It appears that some roads where 20 mph limits have been implemented are naturally ‘self-explaining roads’ where drivers ‘instinctively’ drive more slowly (because their length provides less opportunity to build-up speed, visibility may be limited, drivers do not feel that they have sufficient space to drive faster or feel that it is appropriate to do so, and because they serve local start/end destinations only). In other cases, the look and feel of the road naturally encourages higher speeds. In many cases the implementation of a 20 mph limit has simply formalised existing behaviour.

The challenge is how to change driver attitudes and behaviour in other locations. Evidence from this study (and others) shows that bigger speed reductions occur on faster roads, with higher volumes of traffic and providing a locally important strategic function.

Circular 01/2013 encourages authorities to consider introducing 20 mph limits on more major streets where foot and cycle movements are important, but also advises that where average speeds exceed 24 mph, the introduction of signage only is unlikely to lead to 20 mph compliance. This study supports this advice and confirms that on faster roads more needs to be done to achieve compliance and maximise the benefits. Even on these types of roads the actual reduction in speeds has been small, with lowering the speed limit using signs alone leading to a reduction in speed of about 1 mph. Without supporting measures to encourage compliance, there is a risk that non-compliance with the speed limit becomes the norm.

See the full report here.

Road Safety Fact Sheet (20 mph zones)

20 mph speed limits on roads: Report into the effectiveness of 20 miles per hour (mph) road speed limits.


 

New 20 MPH Signs Arrive In Flockton

Update: April 2019

“Following on from the installation of the 20mph zone, I have talked to Highways about some of the comments I have been receiving from local residents. Highways have agreed to install some more 20mph roundels, so that there is more visibility of these through the 20mph zone and they will also be arranging to paint 20mph signs on the road surface at the access points.” – Cllr. John Taylor (as posted on Flockton facebook pages)

“Further to John’s post regarding the 20mph Zone, we have also had a note from the Police that they will be undertaking some enforcement in the next few weeks.” – Cllr. Richard Smith


Here they are – a little earlier than expected. Complete with artwork by children from Flockton C of E C First School.

New 20 sign - flocktonbypass.co.uk 20 MPH Flockton- flocktonbypass.co.uk20 MPH Flockton- flocktonbypass.co.uk
There are 4 signs altogether – 2 at each end of the village.

There are some nice photographs on the school’s public facebook page. I am currently awaiting a reply to see if we can have permission to embed the post on this page.


 

Flockton Residents Receive Proposed Speed Reduction Plan

Flockton residents have received official notice from Kirklees Council, that 20 mph speed limits are to be considered for parts of the village, to improve road safety. This comes after residents requesting a bypass have continued to lobby the Council to take a more proactive stance on the safety of pedestrians, particularly in the more vulnerable areas of the village, such as in the vicinity of the Primary School and existing traffic calming. The images below can be clicked on to enlarge and downloaded if you don’t already have copies.

Any comments or concerns can be sent to the Council, via the email shown in the letter, or made by phone call, by 27 July 2018.

Speed Reduction Proposal Letter - flocktonbypass.co.uk

Speed Limits Map - flocktonbypass.co.uk


 

Highways Responds to Traffic Recording Strips

Cllr John Taylor has now received a response from Highways, following the recent use of traffic recording (count and speed) strips placed throughout Flockton village, from 16 May 2018.

“The detailed response from Highways about my request, supported by Jacqui Gedman, the Chief Executive and my ward Colleagues for an end to end road safety audit of Barnsley Rd and the reason for the recording strips that were across the road. Rather than summaries I have copied below the entire response.”

“We have now received the speed counts back that we did before the half term holidays, which have allowed us to better assess the extents of any speed limit changes for the village. The team have also spent some time walking up and down the village to get a feel for where the issues are, and looked at the casualty information for the full length of the current 30mph section.

All of the 7 traffic counters we placed recorded speeds in both directions, over the full week, and from that we know that the slowest speeds through the village were recorded on either approach to the school , and then gets gradually faster as you travel away. Phill will also send the full summary of results next week, but the average speed across all the counts is around 28mph eastbound and 32mph westbound.

The 2 outer counters, one approaching Haigh Lane (from Grange Moor), the other approaching Hardcastle Lane, from the M1, also classified the vehicles travelling over them, and identified their direction of travel.

From this information we know that average of 419 HGV’s (7.8% of the overall traffic volume) travelled Westbound* towards the M1 (in 24 hrs), in contravention of the existing weight limit order. Whilst some of those may have been legitimately delivering to the village, it is likely that some are not. We will now be sharing the count information with the Police, so they can target enforcement, once they feel confident that the weight limit order is written in a way that allows them to prosecute without challenge. I know Joe Walker has been in touch with you regarding this.

The team have used all this info to score a scheme to reduce the speed limit through the village, against the Policy and the agreed criteria. They will be contacting you with draft proposals for a 20mph speed limit next week, along with the full count summary for each site.

The hope is that you and your ward colleagues will be able to sense check the limits of the proposed 20mph limit, and then advise on the best methods of consultation with the village residents.

The 20mph limit will be supported by a refresh of all the lining, 20mph repeater signs, both on sign posts, but also in roundels on the carriageway, and features on the ground, on approach to the new 20 limit, to slow traffic down.

The Road Safety team will also be contacting the school this month to discuss working with them on a competition to design some road signs to go at the entrance to the 20mph limit, and also on what additional education and training we can do with them, including refreshing their travel plan, and what we can do to help encourage more of their children to walk to school.

If we start the ball rolling with them now, then they have time to plan time for the sign designs to be worked on when the children return to school after the summer.

That will coincide with, hopefully, the completed consultation with the village, the formal advertising of a scheme through Sept, to allow a scheme on the ground in Oct, assuming no objections are received to the formal advertising.”

John concludes by saying: “Clearly there is a lot to do and with my ward Colleagues we will work with you on the detail regarding this. As I say, this is hot news, from an email I just received and hopefully we can flesh this out a little at the public meeting [held in the Church, on Friday 15 June at 6:30 pm] and I will share more on here as and when I get more detail.”

*Should be Eastbound

A Lot of Mud!

In addition to the usual traffic issues, the village of Flockton is getting very muddy from access and egress of the building site in the centre of the village – and these photographs were taken on a dry day!

Mud by David R - flocktonbypass.co.uk

A Bit Muddy - flocktonbypass.co.uk

And it’s also affecting the residents of Emley…

Gemma L W - Mud in Emley 5 Feb 2018 - flocktonbypass.co.uk

The knock-on effect of this, in addition to making the road more hazardous, is that children are also slipping on the pavements (sometimes falling) and generally, getting muddy on their way to and from school.